978.952.6888

The Samuel Fitch House

The Samuel Fitch House is an 18th Century Saltbox Colonial and was the childhood home of the Innkeeper and her five brothers. Filled with centuries of history as well as decades of wonderful family memories, it offers quiet colonial comfort and a warm welcome.

 A local minister, Walter Powers, built the house in 1711. The original home has five fireplaces around a central chimney, which includes a smoke room where meat was cured. In the dining room is the Parson's Cupboard. The legend is that babies were placed out of harm's way during Indian attacks. The house used as a tavern, where local committeemen held meetings during the Revolutionary War. As a stop on the Underground Railroad, the cellar houses a tunnel used for escape by slaves. Stories from the five previous owners have been passed down through the generations. Sunday teas and tours include such stories and folklore as well as historical information about the Westford area.

Guest Accommodations

Accommodations in the main house include two beautifully appointed suites. The Fitch Suite consists of a queen-sized canopy bed with a fireplaced sitting room, screened porch, and private bath.

The Garden Suite has two bedrooms with a private bath, perfect for a family. Breakfast is served on the screened porch during warmer months and in the original dining room at other times.

 

 

The Carriage House

Attached to the main house is a private two-story Carriage House. This suite includes a fireplaced sitting area, breakfast nook with microwave, toaster, coffee pot and refrigerator. The upstairs bedroom contains a queen-sized bed in a large cathedral ceiling room with window seats and a private bath. A secluded outdoor deck with patio furniture and gas grill complete this suite. Organic fruits and vegetables grown on the property are served with the guests' breakfasts.

 The property has several private outdoor sitting areas, many flowering trees, wild berries, and gardens. The two-acre lawn backs up against a wooded lot with stone walls meandering through the land toward the neighboring ski area.

Following the Drinking Gourd Path to Freedom

This is a spiritual song closely associated with the underground railway—a map and escapes instructions are embedded as a code that enabled enslaved persons to make their way North to freedom:

When the Sun comes back And the first quail calls Follow the Drinking Gourd. For the old man is a-waiting for to carry you to freedom If you follow the Drinking Gourd

 The riverbank makes a very good road. The dead trees will show you the way. Left foot, peg foot, traveling on, Follow the Drinking Gourd.

The river ends between two hills, Follow the Drinking Gourd. There is another river on the other side Follow the Drinking Gourd.

 When the great big river meets the little river Follow the Drinking Gourd.  For the old man is a-waiting for to carry you to freedom If you follow the Drinking Gourd.

Let Us Host Your Meeting or Event

 

TESTIMONIALS

Let Us Host Your Meeting or Event

 

TESTIMONIALS

Let Us Host Your

Meeting or Event

 

Contact Us: 978.952.6888 91 Powers Road Westford MA 01886

Innkeeper, Lynne Smithwood

2018 . The Samuel Fitch House.

All Rights Reserved

The Samuel Fitch House

The Samuel Fitch House is an 18th Century Saltbox Colonial and was the childhood home of the Innkeeper and her five brothers. Filled with centuries of history as well as decades of wonderful family memories, it offers quiet colonial comfort and a warm welcome.

 A local minister, Walter Powers, built the house in 1711. The original house has five fireplaces around a central chimney, which includes a smoke room where meat was cured. In the dining room is the Parson's Cupboard. The legend is that babies were placed out of harm's way during Indian attacks. The house was subsequently used as a tavern, where local committee men held meetings during the Revolutionary War. As a stop on the Underground Railroad, the cellar houses a tunnel used for escape by slaves. Stories from the five previous owners have been passed down through the generations. Sunday teas and tours include such stories and folklore as well as historic information about the Westford area.

Guest Accommodations

Accommodations in the main house includes two beautifully appointed suites. The Fitch Suite includes a queen-sized canopy bed with a fireplaced sitting room, screened porch and private bath.

The Garden Suite has two bedrooms with a private bath, perfect for a family. Breakfast is served on the screened porch during warmer months and in the original dining room at other times.

 

 

The Carriage House

Attached to the main house is a private two-story Carriage House. This suite includes a fireplaced sitting area, breakfast nook with microwave, toaster, coffee pot and refrigerator. The upstairs bedroom includes a queen-sized bed in a large cathedral ceiling room with window seats and a private bath. A secluded outdoor deck with patio furniture and gas grill complete this suite. Organic fruits and vegetables grown on the property are served with the guests' breakfasts.

 The property has several private outdoor sitting areas, many flowering trees, wild berries and gardens. The two acre lawn backs up against a wooded lot with stone walls meandering through the land toward the neighboring ski area.

Following the Drinking Gourd

Path to Freedom

This is a spiritual song closely associated with the underground railway—a map and escape instructions are embedded as a code that enabled enslaved persons to make their way North to freedom:

When the Sun comes back And the first quail calls Follow the Drinking Gourd. For the old man is a-waiting for to carry you to freedom If you follow the Drinking Gourd

 The riverbank makes a very good road. The dead trees will show you the way. Left foot, peg foot, traveling on, Follow the Drinking Gourd.

The river ends between two hills, Follow the Drinking Gourd. There is another river on the other side Follow the Drinking Gourd.

 When the great big river meets the little river Follow the Drinking Gourd.  For the old man is a-waiting for to carry you to freedom If you follow the Drinking Gourd.

a

The Samuel

Fitch House

The Samuel Fitch House is an 18th Century Saltbox Colonial and was the childhood home of the Innkeeper and her five brothers. Filled with centuries of history as well as decades of wonderful family memories, it offers quiet colonial comfort and a warm welcome.

 A local minister, Walter Powers, built the house in 1711. The original house has five fireplaces around a central chimney, which includes a smoke room where meat was cured. In the dining room is the Parson's Cupboard. The legend is that babies were placed out of harm's way during Indian attacks. The house was subsequently used as a tavern, where local committee men held meetings during the Revolutionary War. As a stop on the Underground Railroad, the cellar houses a tunnel used for escape by slaves. Stories from the five previous owners have been passed down through the generations. Sunday teas and tours include such stories and folklore as well as historic information about the Westford area.

Guest Accommodations

Guest accommodations in the main house includes two beautifully appointed suites. The Fitch Suite includes a queen-sized canopy bed with a fireplaced sitting room, screened porch and private bath.

The Garden Suite has two bedrooms with a private bath, perfect for a family. Breakfast is served on the screened porch during warmer months and in the original dining room at other times.

 

Guest Accommodations

Accommodations in the main house includes two beautifully appointed suites. The Fitch Suite includes a queen-sized canopy bed with a fireplaced sitting room, screened porch and private bath.

The Garden Suite has two bedrooms with a private bath, perfect for a family. Breakfast is served on the screened porch during warmer months and in the original dining room at other times.

 

The Carriage House

Attached to the main house is a private two-story Carriage House. This suite includes a fireplaced sitting area, breakfast nook with microwave, toaster, coffee pot and refrigerator. The upstairs bedroom includes a queen-sized bed in a large cathedral ceiling room with window seats and a private bath. A secluded outdoor deck with patio furniture and gas grill complete this suite. Organic fruits and vegetables grown on the property are served with the guests' breakfasts.

 The property has several private outdoor sitting areas, many flowering trees, wild berries and gardens. The two acre lawn backs up against a wooded lot with stone walls meandering through the land toward the neighboring ski area.

The Carriage House

Attached to the main house is a private two-story Carriage House. This suite includes a fireplaced sitting area, breakfast nook with microwave, toaster, coffee pot and refrigerator. The upstairs bedroom includes a queen-sized bed in a large cathedral ceiling room with window seats and a private bath. A secluded outdoor deck with patio furniture and gas grill complete this suite. Organic fruits and vegetables grown on the property are served with the guests' breakfasts.

 The property has several private outdoor sitting areas, many flowering trees, wild berries and gardens. The two acre lawn backs up against a wooded lot with stone walls meandering through the land toward the neighboring ski area.

Q
a

The Samuel

Fitch House

The Samuel Fitch House is an 18th Century Saltbox Colonial and was the childhood home of the Innkeeper and her five brothers. Filled with centuries of history as well as decades of wonderful family memories, it offers quiet colonial comfort and a warm welcome.

 A local minister, Walter Powers, built the house in 1711. The original house has five fireplaces around a central chimney, which includes a smoke room where meat was cured. In the dining room is the Parson's Cupboard. The legend is that babies were placed out of harm's way during Indian attacks. The house was subsequently used as a tavern, where local committee men held meetings during the Revolutionary War. As a stop on the Underground Railroad, the cellar houses a tunnel used for escape by slaves. Stories from the five previous owners have been passed down through the generations. Sunday teas and tours include such stories and folklore as well as historic information about the Westford area.

Guest Accommodations

Accommodations in the main house includes two beautifully appointed suites. The Fitch Suite includes a queen-sized canopy bed with a fireplaced sitting room, screened porch and private bath.

The Garden Suite has two bedrooms with a private bath, perfect for a family. Breakfast is served on the screened porch during warmer months and in the original dining room at other times.

 

Following the Drinking Gourd Path to Freedom

This is a spiritual song closely associated with the underground railway—a map and escape instructions are embedded as a code that enabled enslaved persons to make their way North to freedom:

When the Sun comes back And the first quail calls Follow the Drinking Gourd. For the old man is a-waiting for to carry you to freedom If you follow the Drinking Gourd

 The riverbank makes a very good road. The dead trees will show you the way. Left foot, peg foot, traveling on, Follow the Drinking Gourd.

The river ends between two hills, Follow the Drinking Gourd. There is another river on the other side Follow the Drinking Gourd.

 When the great big river meets the little river Follow the Drinking Gourd.  For the old man is a-waiting for to carry you to freedom If you follow the Drinking Gourd.

The Samuel Fitch House

The Samuel Fitch House is an 18th Century Saltbox Colonial and was the childhood home of the Innkeeper and her five brothers. Filled with centuries of history as well as decades of wonderful family memories, it offers quiet colonial comfort and a warm welcome.

 A local minister, Walter Powers, built the house in 1711. The original house has five fireplaces around a central chimney, which includes a smoke room where meat was cured. In the dining room is the Parson's Cupboard. The legend is that babies were placed out of harm's way during Indian attacks. The house was subsequently used as a tavern, where local committee men held meetings during the Revolutionary War. As a stop on the Underground Railroad, the cellar houses a tunnel used for escape by slaves. Stories from the five previous owners have been passed down through the generations. Sunday teas and tours include such stories and folklore as well as historic information about the Westford area.